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Business Learning Meaningful Work and Life product development software development

What I talk about When I talk about software development (part 1)

A Brief of My Thoughts and Beliefs regarding development of software – and other things.

January 2020, a winter resembling a mix of late autumn and early spring (stretching February – why is it so hard to finish this article? 😊
Finishing off, end of August, it was a long summer “holiday”, and now the need to transfer the writings from Word into wordpress, always a pain, another obstacle to fight..

Apart from being a believer in test driven design, quick feedback loops and delivery of real value…
I believe in Magic.

Reading and understanding; the article “Programming as Theory Building – by Peter Naur”, the book “Design Thinking – by David West & Rebecca Rikner”, the concepts of “Mob programming – by Woody Zuill” and “Domain Driven Design – by Eric Evans”, pretty much sums up my core beliefs regarding development of software, systems, products and teams.

Perhaps the most important, in software products, is to create a ubiquitous language, connecting business and programmers with a common understanding of the domain, pushing the development into the domain knowledge space; with this in place there is a good chance of doing the right thing.

All above, together with the many other optional tools born in the thriving community around DDD Europe – I am convinced magic things will happen.

Thoughts

  • Software development – is all about the outcome based on the theories built by one or more persons, often a team; a team is all the people involved, such as experts, developers/programmers, users and other stake holders that can affect the team and the product.
  • The actual fit – of the outcome of an implementation in the real world, is highly effected by the designers understanding of the problem space, the current system and the wanted state, and the designers abilities and his intentional alteration of that system by adding, removing or changing some part(s) while hoping for the intended outcome.

    The question of when and how well a solution fits, hints that short feedback loops are extremely important during the design, prototyping and implementation of a system – unfortunately many teams don´t work with feedback until they deliver a “ready to ship” product or feature.
  • Mob programming could be compared to modern processors with multiple cores. A single brain does not have the same capacity, for thinking and exploring, as two or more brains do; therefore, I see this as a fundamentally better way to do qualitative knowledge work, while also gaining social stimuli, and providing a more challenging and creative environment.

    I believe one of the reasons we left the mob programming style in favour for individual work is due to management seeing software production as something that can be broken up to a manufacturing production line, and when computers became less expensive than people this was a natural step in the “factory setup”; this is in many ways how “teams” work today, even “agile” teams, with a Kanban board and tickets for as small tasks as possible, sometimes even broken up by “upper level people”.
  • Trust – the more we know the people we work with on a personal level, the more we trust them for their proven track record; working in tight teams forces you to become closer.
  • Flow – according to science, the most fulfilling type of flow is achieved in collaboration, like in a football team or solving problems together with colleagues. I believe it is also easier to maintain a flow state in a group of engaged people, than when working alone – especially if working “alone” in an open plan office
  • Magic teamwork – when work becomes teamwork, work becomes play; when work is play, work becomes fun; when work is fun people get on fire; when people get on fire by doing work they love – magic things starts to happen. I want magic teamwork in any game I play.

Design thinking.

Reading “Design thinking – The key to enterprise agility, innovation and sustainability”, by David West and Rebecca Rikner gave me an awakening, of some kind, realizing who I am and what lights my fire.

I have always loved to understand how things work, fascinated by the beauty of nature and in love with functional design. Being creative with my hands since childhood, forming for usability or mimicking nature, I guess other paths could have led me to become a carpenter or architect (of buildings).

This is me, Design Thinking + IT Thinking + Business Thinking

When I opened this page, it was like Dave had picked my brain and soul and found my core interests, background and future.

An “explanation” of the mapping I see when I read this picture…

A former colleague told me “you are an organizational genius – that’s just how it is”, others have said “You are extremely quick in picking up and understand the core of the overall system”.

I studied to become avionics engineer and liked the idea of fixing airplanes but didn’t love it, so I moved on.

I have studied business finance and liked the accounting but loved the marketing and had fun, with my friend, creating print and web marketing for restaurants and nightclubs – and a golf course panorama overview (long before street maps).

I have studied history of arts and design, materials and production techniques, and liked the ideas of Lean manufacturing but loved the creative process of product design with brand recognition.

I have worked in many non-IT related areas such as mechanics, manufacturing, sales, support, warehouses, and in a variety of IT related areas such as tech support, infrastructure (servers, network etc.), and since 2013 in different software development teams, mainly in product companies but also as consultant.

Wherever I have been, I have seen ways to improve things, like management, the way of working or the physical working environment – in most of the places I have left a footprint, either by changing a process, way of working, or at least by challenging the ways of doing things. If needed I also act as a secret janitor to fix or improve things at the physical work place just because I care about my environment (have problems with broken and filthy things, not OCD but probably closer than many 😉)

I need to feel joy and ease in my working environment

A brief overview of the contents in the book Design Thinking

To be continued… part 2 in this context is about ”Teams – and groups”

Kategorier
Business Learning product development software development Tools

Why Maps? Why Wardley Maps?

Why (Wardley) Maps?

In short; because if you have a map you have a context and it gives you situational awareness – without a map to navigate your business, or personal, goals you are probably walking in a dark room with the light of a matchstick – with a map you are walking in the same dark room, but holding a flashlight; giving you the opportunity to be aware of the space you are in. Having situational awareness is a strategic advantage over those who don’t, probably most companies and organization, but more importantly you have the opportunity to actually find new paths or new ways to travel on your map; or how to even redraw the map as you would like it to bee or how the future would look like.

a map gives you situational awareness, making you aware of the space you are in

A real world map example.

Imagine you are going, by car, from Stockholm in Sweden to Helsinki in Finland – you know you need a car, to explore some areas and cities around Helsinki, and to visit a friend in Lahti; about two hours north of the capital.

Without a map and no experience of the route you are likely to depend on asking people on your way there, if you are lucky you get good directions, and don’t have to stop too many times asking for new.

Now, here is a map for you, with the major roads and some water routes plotted. Depending on your needs you could now think of two ways to travel, the first and perhaps most obvious is to go by car around the water (a drive taking about 20-21 hours non stop), the second way would be to go over the water, but then you need a boat, and you must be able to take your car on the boat, but you don’t have access to a boat and are not comfortable with the idea of sailing; the drive of 20 hours seems like the best option.

But, then you meet someone, like me, you show me the map and talk about your travel plans.

me: – ”that sounds like a fun trip, are you going to see anything special up north? Like the polar light or playing golf in Tornio with 11 holes in Sweden and 7 in Finland !? ~I would like to to do that too!”
you: ”no, didn’t plan that, I just want to see Helsinki and meet a friend a couple of hours north from there”
me: ”I see, but.. why don’t you take the ferry then? you can sleep, eat, relax and even get a SPA treatment if you like while going there, I mean, instead of driving all the way”
you: ”Oh.. is there a ferry line? that sound like a better option”

me: ”definitely, and yet another option is to go by air and rent a car, or perhaps your friend has a car to borrow while you are there.”
you: ”didn’t think of that, but I’ll take the ferry, it’s definitely the best option for this trip. Thanks!”

Lesson learned: Having a map to show others and talk about makes things super clear

What could the future look like on the map?

Imagine all the things possible and not really possible to explore what might be in a future, near or distant.

Could there be a tunnel under the Baltic Sea? (Östersjön) or a bridge crossing it? Or perhaps the sea could dry out? Or the lands be extended into the sea? Or a massive earthquake could move the countries together?

If you have a map it is easy to start adding layers of ideas and to test concepts in the context of the map.

REMEMBER – on a map, the space has meaning, and you might think of the space as being an obstacle, but know that the obstacle often is the way – ”every obstacle is an opportunity in disguise

On Wardley Maps, mapping businesses, products and perhaps your personal future and current situation read this article with resources.

Kategorier
CQRS event-sourcing Learning software development

Commands and commandHandlers

CQRS and Event sourcing – Resources

When looking at this video walk-through of OAuth Event Modeling in Go by Jamie there was a question about how to handle commands without the need of switches over the command types.

So my reply on that got a little longer and thought I would share the resources I pointed to here (to free the comment from being stuck in youtube)

Great example and walk through Jamie! (and thanks to the rest of you for value provided)

Regarding handling events without the switch, I do not know Go – but in C# you usually register EventHandlers with commands and you will have a dispatcher or similar as a single entry point where the handlers knows what commands they should act on. see examples in referred links below.

So, maybe this is not for Go devs, but you might get some ideas from it, anyhow.. here are some links for c# resources.

SuperSafeBank

”This repository shows how to implement Event Sourcing, CQRS and DDD in .NET Core, using a Bank as example.”

This (C#) repository looks like a great example application ( a little more complexity, I haven’t dived deep into it yet) https://github.com/mizrael/SuperSafeBank

CQRS in Practice (course and code)

Vladimir Khorikov, my go to guy when looking for quality examples, and learning the craft in C#, shares some high quality stuff (pluralsight corses and blog https://enterprisecraftsmanship.com/posts/types-of-cqrs/)

In this repository, https://github.com/vkhorikov/CqrsInPractice/blob/master/After (from the Pluralisght course CQRS in Practice) – you can see an implementation example; I’ll try to flesh out the command and commandhandler stuff for you here.

I like to look at things in the order of ”from entry point in the API”, Hope you can follow my logic =)

Command to Result flow.

API

start in ’Api\Controllers\StudentController.cs’.Register(…)

//called from UI to register student
Register(NewStudentDto dto)
            var command = new RegisterCommand(...); // (Logic\AppServices\RegisterCommand.cs)
            Result result = _messages.Dispatch(command); //finds handler, handles the command and returns the result.

The message Dispatcher

in ’Logic\Utils\Messages.cs’

in ’Messages.Dispatch(command)’ the matching handler for the command is looked up, via DI, and then executed (aka handled).

handler = _provider.GetService(handlerType); // System.IServiceProvider (built in)
result = handler.Handle(command);

The Registration of handlers

Startup.cs

DI, Dependency Injection, is configured in ’API\Startup.cs’ and handlers, for commands and queries; these are registered via services.AddHandlers() – where ’services’ is ’Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection’

HandlerRegistration

’Api\Utils\HandlerRegistration.cs’.AddHandlers()

  • This class takes care of finding, and registering, all handlers of type ICommandHandler and IQueryHandler in the assembly,
  • making them available for use from IServiceProvider.GetService(serviceType)

Kategorier
event-sourcing Learning software development tutorials Uncategorized

EventStore(DB) Getting Started

https://github.com/JimiSweden/eventstore-getting-started

Here is the repository for my getting started project following the guide from eventstore.com

To be continued… Eventually